Mag­netic Res­o­nance Imag­ing (MRI)

MUHC, 2019
Canada

What is Mag­netic Res­o­nance Imag­ing (MRI)?

Mag­netic Res­o­nance Imag­ing or MRI is a new way to visu­al­ize the inside of the body. This new tech­nol­ogy has no harm­ful bio­log­i­cal effect.

What Is spe­cial about Mag­netic Resonance?

This new Imag­ing tech­nique does not use ion­iz­ing radi­a­tion like X-​Rays or CT. It is pain­less, has no side effects and in 90% of the cases does not require injec­tion of con­trast agents. This tech­nique gives addi­tional infor­ma­tions to other diag­nos­tic methods.

How does it work?

In the scan­ner you will be exposed to two nat­ural phe­nom­ena: a mag­netic field and Radio waves. Water mol­e­cules within your body will react to those two forces, by align­ing them­selves with the mag­netic field as well as reemit­ting radio sig­nals match­ing those emit­ted by the sys­tem. These sig­nals are then processed into images with the use of a computer.

What should I do dur­ing the exam?

The only things we will ask you to do is to stay still and relax as we pro­ceed with the examination.

Will I feel Something?

Not at all but you will hear lots of knock­ing noises when we do the images.

How long does it take?

The time of exam­i­na­tion varies from 30 to 60 min­utes accord­ing to the type of infor­ma­tion your doc­tor needs.

Are there any spe­cial prepa­ra­tions prior to the exam?

Make sure you do not carry any metal­lic objects. Keep Bank and credit cards out­side the exam­i­na­tion room. Wear­ing some kind of jog­ging suit is recommended.

FOOD AND FLU­IDS SHOULD BE RESTRICTED 3 HOURS PRIOR TO EXAM.

What must I remove?

You must remove all metal­lic objects, including:

  • Glasses
  • Coins
  • Hair pins
  • Pencils/​pens
  • Bank and credit cards
  • Hear­ing aids
  • Keys
  • Watches
  • Pocket knives
  • Wal­lets

Who can­not have an MRI scan?

Any per­son who:

  • has a car­diac pace-​maker.
  • has sur­gi­cal clips on blood ves­sels, espe­cially in the brain.
  • has pieces of metal in their body, espe­cially the eye and ear (from an acci­dent, weld­ing, mil­i­tary ser­vice, etc…)

Must I be alone?

The design of the equip­ment is such that it is not pos­si­ble for some­one to be by your side. In extreme con­di­tions some­one may be in the exam­i­na­tion room for reassurance.

ANY­ONE STAY­ING IN THE SCAN ROOM MUST ALSO FOL­LOW THE SAME PREPA­RA­TION AS THE PATIENT.

After the exam you will be able to attend nor­mal activ­i­ties with­out any problems.

What hap­pens dur­ing the exam?

Dur­ing the test you will be required to lie very still on a bed inside a large scan­ner. Dur­ing the scan­ning pro­ce­dure you will hear knock­ing sounds. With MR there is no radi­a­tion or radioac­tive mate­r­ial. If you are on med­ica­tion, please take it as scheduled.

IT IS IMPOR­TANT TO KEEP YOUR EYES CLOSED WHEN THE HEAD IS BEING EXAMINED.

Why must I keep my appointment?

Due to the length of the pro­ce­dure only a small num­ber of patients can be exam­ined each day. We make every effort to stay on sched­ule, but please bring a book or craft in case you must wait. We also ask that you arrive 30 min­utes ear­lier than your appoint­ment time.

Can­cel­la­tion procedures

CALL: 5143988510
It is impor­tant to can­cel and rebook your scan if you are unable to keep your appoint­ment. This allows us to use your time slot for another patient, and decrease the wait­ing time for all patients.

Whom should I call if I have any concerns?

If you have ques­tions, please call your doc­tor who requested the exam.

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Addi­tional Information

Infor­ma­tion about MRI Clinic
Tel. (or exten­sion): 888510 (3988510)
Mon­treal Neu­ro­log­i­cal Hos­pi­tal, Room WB3
3801 Uni­ver­sity St., Mon­treal, Que­bec, H3A 2B4

Infor­ma­tion about InfoNEURO
Neuro-​Patient Resource Cen­tre
Mon­treal Neu­ro­log­i­cal Hosp­tial Room 354
Tel: (514) 3985358
E-​mail: infoneuro@​muhc.​mcgill.​ca
Web site: http://​infoneuro​.mcgill​.ca/

This infor­ma­tion is for edu­ca­tional pur­poses only, and is not intended to replace the advice of a pro­fes­sional health­care prac­ti­tioner, or to sub­sti­tute for med­ical care.

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